April 2018 — The Miami metro area is booming. As of 2016, the city was ranked the 8th largest for population and the 6th largest for employment growth among big U.S. cities. People are flocking to Miami to take advantage of everything it has to offer: warm weather, rich culture and unique business opportunities. It truly is one of a kind.

However, with an increasing population comes increasing challenges. With limited space to expand, the city continues to look for innovative ways to update its infrastructure in order to accommodate the growing number of residents and employees. Companies are experimenting with new technologies in order to improve safety and efficiency in the most cost-effective way.

Invest: Miami spoke with a number of leaders in the city’s infrastructure industry to gain insight into how Miami plans to successfully increase its capacity limit in the most economical, sustainable and feasible manner. Here’s what they said:

Humberto Alonso, Senior Regional Business Development Director, Atkins North America

“One of the challenges in South Florida is that solutions for transportation that work elsewhere involve building more miles of road or widening streets. We’re past that point here, particularly in Miami-Dade County. There’s no more room to build, so we need to look for other solutions. Technology will be a part of it, but there has to be an infrastructure investment as well. People have to change the way they think about going from one place to another.”

Eric Silagy, President & CEO, Florida Power and Light Company

“In Miami-Dade in particular, it’s critical that we continue to support growth in the region in a comprehensive and forward-thinking manner. The construction boom in Miami over the last few years has been enormous, but it can be challenging from an infrastructure perspective. A lot of planning needs to be done in advance to be able to meet the needs of the new developments. We’ve made great strides in working with regional stakeholders to understand what is coming and the timeframe for these investments so that we can properly plan and execute projects on our end to be ready to support these developments. It’s important to work together to provide opportunities for continued growth while minimizing the impact to those who already live and work in the area. And of course, we must continue to improve and enhance our storm preparation and response planning so that we are able to get the lights back on as quickly as possible after a major storm — particularly in an economic hub like Miami.”

Melsie Ordonez, Director of Operations & Senior Mechanical Engineer, Ross & Baruzzini

“The great thing about working with Miami International Airport is that they are at the forefront of innovation and offer opportunities to explore outside the box. One of the nuances in that environment is the need to tie into the existing infrastructure. We’re doing a small renovation in Concourse G, which is one of the original concourses. There are systems there that need to keep running to keep planes moving even while they are being worked on and added to. Tech is moving fast, and we need to marry the old and the new.”

Eddy Smith, Senior Vice President of Client Services, SCS Engineers

“We use some different approaches that might be more economical. Instead of putting two feet of soil on top of contamination, we’re challenging the old standards and saying, ‘Why can’t we use less than two feet and put in a synthetic barrier?’ We’ve gotten traction and save our clients a whole lot of money by doing that.”

To find out more about our interviewees above, visit their websites at:

Atkins North America: http://www.atkinsglobal.com/en-gb/north-america
Florida Power and Light Company: https://www.fpl.com
Ross & Baruzzini: http://www.rossbar.com
SCS Engineers: http://www.scsengineers.com