Let’s get virtual: Six must-read tips for engaging online

Let’s get virtual: Six must-read tips for engaging online

By: Abby Melone

It’s a brave new world for everyone. Quarantine, lockdown, self-isolation and sheltering in place characterize the new normal imposed by COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus. In a virtuous cycle, people depend on strong businesses, which depend on a strong economy, which depends on strong businesses that depend on people.

 

The fact is that people, businesses and the economy shouldn’t just stop, even in such unprecedented times, and perhaps more so because of this crisis. Fortunately, this is also the era of high technology, and there is no time like the present to show just what that technology is capable of, especially in business dealings.

 

As the pandemic stretches on, more businesses are turning to virtual meetings to get things done. Skype, Zoom … these are the most vital tools for business today. But as everyone has intimately discovered, when an in-person meeting becomes virtual, much can be lost, and the road to disaster can be perilously short when you’re online. We all want to be as effective as if we were physically there, but how do we stay engaging and charming and avoid as many distractions, hiccups and potential disasters as possible?

 

Like any good professional, you need to know the tricks of the trade. Here are some tips to help:

 

Positioning of the camera. A wacky camera angle can be extremely distracting. Who wants to see directly into the inside of your nose? Pull down your computer screen slightly to make sure the camera is dead on rather than pointing upward, which most likely is your more natural way to position the screen.

 

Background noise. There is no better way to turn off the person you are meeting with than some distracting noise. Be conscious of your surroundings, especially now that you are most likely working from home: clanking jewelry, dog barking, roommate or significant other also working from home. 

 

Distracting background. Make sure you do not give the person you are meeting with the opportunity to focus on a picture of the sports team you love but they hate. Position yourself against an empty wall or something non-distracting.

 

Don’t look at yourself in the video. Very few of us can resist glancing, or even staring, at our own camera window. Don’t! The person you are meeting can see you are distracted by you and not them. Also, you miss loads of cues from the other person when you are staring into your own eyes. Is the person you are meeting with interested? Engaged? Bored? Distracted? You won’t know unless you are looking at them.

 

Try to maintain a dialog. It’s easy to steal the “conversation” and talk and talk and talk. Be sure to make time in your presentation to see where the other person is, do they have questions, are they following along?

 

Know your demo tools: both the functionality of the platform as well as the material you will be showing. The person on your computer screen is watching your every move, so the more comfortable you are with your tools, the more flawless (and therefore impressive) you come across in your meetings. Close out all windows you would not want someone to see before your meeting starts (email, social media, YouTube). Remember: when technology goes wrong, it can take you from being competent and impressive to the alternative in seconds.

Maintaining unity and creating value through virtual meetings

Maintaining unity and creating value through virtual meetings

By: Felipe Rivas

2 min read April 2020The novel coronavirus forced a global halt to major international, regional and local events. From the NBA season to networking conferences, all gatherings of any size stopped abruptly in an effort to flatten the curve and prevent COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, from spreading further. However, as the population at large becomes accustomed to social distancing, stay at home orders and self quarantining, many events went from a hard stop to full speed ahead virtually. As the business community adjusts to the challenges of the disruption caused by the coronavirus, many institutions are building value and maintaining relationships by maximizing the use of webinars, online classes, video conferences and even virtual happy hours. 

 

In Philadelphia, World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia, an organization dedicated to accelerating global business growth for companies in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South New Jersey, has turned to virtual meetings to stay connected with its members. “We understand how important it is to remain connected with our members and client companies during this challenging time,” Spokeswoman Graziella DiNuzzo told Invest: Philadelphia. “Like many other organizations, we are using Zoom meetings.” The center has maintained rapport with its members as it made the transition to work remotely. “We are handling this transition quite smoothly. We are a staff of seven professionals and have always maintained close contact with our clients via phone and email and working remotely doesn’t slow us down,” DiNuzzo said. 

Bringing members together in this time of uncertainty is among the center’s main goals. “Our member-company meeting is our “Member Conversations,” which we started last year as a way to bring our members together, informally, in our conference room to meet each other, talk and share stories,” DiNuzzo said. “This will be the first time, obviously, that we will hold our Member Conversations virtually and we are looking forward to it. The bottom line is that we have to continue to communicate and support each other during this time. We are all eager to get back to business as usual and we don’t know what that will look like. We are hopeful that it will be a rebirth of ideas and opportunities.”

The video conference platform, Zoom, has quickly become ubiquitous across the virtual events space. Across economic sectors, different institutions are taking advantage of Zoom and similar platforms. To host a successful virtual event, event planners must decide between hosting a virtual meeting or a webinar. “If you expect attendees to mostly just listen,” the best option is a webinar, Zoom advises as part of its digital event best practices. “When you need more back and forth between the audience and the host,” planners should choose a virtual meeting, the platform advises. 

Once the type of digital event has been narrowed down, hosts should hardwire the internet connection to prevent any Wi-Fi-related hiccups or virtual lag. In terms of audio, hosts should test speakers and audio prior to the meeting and minimize any background noise, according to Zoom. Additionally, hosts should dress to impress and make sure to start the virtual event on time. It is important to set the tone of the event and encourage Q&A’s during the virtual meeting or webinar. As a best practice, Zoom recommends the use of the Chat function to keep track of questions and comments. For larger webinars, Zoom offers a PayPal integration to charge the registration fees seamlessly. 

For the time being, social distancing will be part of the mainstream business landscape until at least May. However, many institutions are adjusting and pivoting more and more to the virtual hosting model to build value, share information and regain a sense of community in a time where residents are being asked to self-isolate as much as possible.  

To learn more visit: https://blog.zoom.us/wordpress/2020/03/04/best-practices-for-hosting-a-digital-event/

 https://www.wtcphila.org/covid-19-resources.html 

Home sweet office: How to make your home office work

Home sweet office: How to make your home office work

By: Max Crampton- Thomas

4 min read March 2020 The COVID-19 health pandemic has upended daily life in unprecedented ways amid calls from the government for people to social distance and stay home as much as possible. Many businesses have had to close their doors and ask their employees to work from home. While some individuals may be accustomed to working from a home office setting, for a large majority of the working world this is uncharted waters that could benefit from some guidance. Invest: offers some need-to-know tips for working from home during this time of crisis. 

 

 

Constant Communication 

Working in an office setting, you often take for granted the ease of communication between you and your colleagues. Situations that could have been resolved by simply walking to someone’s desk now require more effort via other methods of communication. The key is to establish a consistent flow of communication that starts with a daily understanding of what your employees’ schedules will look like on any given day. This can be easily accomplished by having them send out their daily schedules and workload in a quick email at the start of every business day. Communication can then be maintained based around this schedule and productivity can be more easily managed as well. For more direct communication in regard to smaller issues that may not require a phone call, office communication applications like Slack can help facilitate these quick discussions. 

Maintain a Daily Routine 

For almost any working person, maintaining a daily routine becomes second nature. When unforeseen circumstances like COVID-19 interrupt this daily routine, it can throw a person off course quite rapidly, which can result in less productivity and a decrease in focus. The key is to adapt and maintain your daily routine to the changing environment as much as possible. Something as simple as getting dressed in business clothing can seem unnecessary when working from home, especially when staying in pajamas all day may sound a lot more appealing, but maintaining this daily activity can be key in starting your work day off on the right foot and retaining as much normalcy as possible. Make the effort to try and stick to your normal work schedule throughout the day, including taking breaks as you would in the office, eating lunch around the same time you normally would and trying to stick to your typical working hours as best as possible. 

Maintaining Posture (Physical & Mental) 

There are many arguments in favor of the benefits of working from home but maintaining your posture, both physical and mental, is probably not high on that list. From a physical standpoint, in an office setting you are usually sitting in a proper desk chair with a relatively straight back or even standing straight up thanks to standing desks. The same cannot normally be said for a home office setting. In an interview with CBS, New York chiropractor Dr. Joseph D. Salamone said, “Everybody’s going to be in sitting postures, having text neck.These people really need to make precautions and live a healthier lifestyle while we’re in this quarantine state.” He recommended that those who find themselves working from home should practice regular stretching to help maintain posture. For those who have the means and access to the proper resources it would also be advisable to create a proper workstation, not unlike the one you are accustomed to in your own office, as opposed to trying to work from a slouched posture on a bed or couch.
Maintaining posture also relates to mental health as much as physical well-being. Going from working in a sociable setting like an office with other people to unexpectedly working by yourself at home can be quite jarring for the mind. It is vitally important to maintain the social connections that you have grown accustomed to in a normal workday, like lunch with coworkers. This social time does not have to be lost as technology has made it so you can use your lunchtime from home to speak with or even video call with coworkers and friends. There is also the underlying issue of potential for increased anxiety during this time of isolation, especially with the influx of nonstop news about COVID-19. It’s crucial that individuals limit the daily amount of time they spend consuming this news, and instead focus their attention on other matters like work, family and the home. 

Creating A Proper Workspace

A proper home workspace may help in maintaining posture but it is also important in helping to facilitate as normal a daily routine as possible. In theory, this workspace is where an individual will spend the majority of their eight-hour working day, so it is crucial that this space is not only comfortable but also practical for achieving daily tasks. Find somewhere in the house that you can maintain your workstation without much interruption, and if possible, somewhere that has access to natural light. Working from home can also be tricky as the lines become blurred between workspace and home space, resulting in it becoming harder to “switch off” after a full working day. It is important to try and establish this workspace in a section of the home that allows you to “step into” work at the beginning of the day and “step out” of work at the end. 

To learn more, visit:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/coronavirus-health-tips-working-from-home-stretching-stress-anxiety/

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/coronavirus-work-from-home-tips

For up-to-date advice on the Coronavirus response, you can check the CDC website here.  For Florida-specific information, click here 

 

 

Philly’s venture funds capitalize on momentum

Philly’s venture funds capitalize on momentum

By: Sara Warden

2 min read March 2020 — According to a recent report by the Philadelphia Alliance for Capital and Technologies (PACT) and Pitchbook, Philadelphia’s 2019 venture investment of $2.5 billion puts the city in seventh place nationally as a VC giant. And as more and more funding flows into Philadelphia, venture capital investment shows no sign of slowing down.

 

In 2019, 225 deals were recorded in Philadelphia, totaling just over $2.5 billion, up just slightly in number of deals since 2018, but notably, deal value has skyrocketed. In 2018, Philly’s VC deals were worth just under $1.5 billion. Across all stages, median deal values have increased, with angel and seed investment in 2019 coming in at a median $1.2 million compared with $600,000 in 2018, early VC doubling to $3.8 million from $1.9 million in 2018 and late VC reaching $7.5 million from $4.2 million in 2018.

The most active investor is Ben Franklin Technology Partners of southeastern Pennsylvania, according to the report, having funded 356 deals. It is a leader in seed capital investments with over $200 million invested over 35 years, launching over 2,000 companies. It is not just volume that counts, but also value. In a record for a Philly-based company, the largest funding round in 2019 was for food delivery service goPuff, which raised $750 million.

But despite this momentum, Philadelphia still has a way to go before it can catch up to VC hubs such as San Francisco, the report says. “Deal size inflation for Philly—though broadly consistent with the YoY persistence of rising valuations across the US—has yet to push median deal sizes to levels reached elsewhere,” the report said. “For example, the median for an early-stage deal in Philadelphia was $3.8 million—roughly half the US median.”

So what are Philadelphia investors doing about it? One lawyer, Ajay Raju, is setting up three new VC funds in the city to capitalize on its success. “There is no shortage of talented founders with great ideas and road maps who are designing the future,” he told the Philadelphia Inquirer. The three companies – 215 Capital, Backswing Ventures and Togo Ventures – will target different investors and aim funds at different sectors. 

215 Capital will be an exclusive, subscription-only Series A pledge fund with just 100 investors and a focus on technology, whether in software as a service or real estate technology. Togo Ventures will focus on the pharma industry, from digital health to clinical trials. And Backswing will be “sector agnostic” to bridge the gap for anything in between. 

“We are geography-agnostic and return-devout,” Raju told the Inquirer in an interview, but admitted that Philadelphia has plenty of opportunities ripe for investment and entrepreneurs hungry for capital to realize their ideas. “Philly’s innovation ecosystem needs capital and plenty of it,” he said.

 

To learn more about our interviewees, visit:

https://www.sep.benfranklin.org/

https://gopuff.com/home

https://www.215capital.com/

https://www.backswingventures.com/

https://philadelphiapact.com/

https://pitchbook.com/

 

Pharmacies Going the Extra Mile in Philadelphia

Pharmacies Going the Extra Mile in Philadelphia

By: Sara Warden

2 min read February 2020 — According to research from the University of Texas, 13-27% of ER visits in the United States could be managed in physician offices, clinics, and urgent care centers, generating $4.4 billion in annual savings for the health system. As the population grows and hospitals become saturated, Philadelphia’s private sector innovation is helping to lift the burden.

Last month, pharmacy giant CVS launched 13 HealthHUBs across Philadelphia and South Jersey, with the goal of offering patients a broader range of health services than are normally available in pharmacies. “The purpose of this model is to put patients at the center of their care,” said Anthony Riccardo, regional director for CVS Pharmacy, at the launch of the Folsom HealthHUB in the Delaware County branch. “Customers tell us they want local access to convenient, personalized and integrated healthcare. Our HealthHUB locations do just that — helping to elevate the store into a community-based healthcare destination.”

CVS leverages its impressive countrywide coverage on the front lines to bring additional services to the community, decreasing the probability that symptoms will worsen and lessening the burden on secondary healthcare providers. The services provided range from counseling patients with chronic conditions, to smoking cessation plans and health screenings, with a focus on addressing potential problems before they arise.

The company is not the only business in the private sector that sees the potential pharmacies can contribute to the healthcare sector. Last month, Philadelphia also welcomed Medly Pharmacy, a company that is tackling inefficiencies in pharmacy operations through an app and service platform that simplifies the process of filling a prescription.

Although the main draw of the store is its online platform, the company’s co-founder, Chirag Kulkarni, recognizes the need to also have a physical store established in the city. “I can say 99% of our customers have never walked into our pharmacy,” he said in an interview with Philadelphia Business Journal. “But it’s critical from a brand perspective to have a pharmacy a person can go into if they wanted. There is a level of trust in medicine, and with a pharmacy having that brick and mortar location brings legitimacy.”

So why are these companies attracted to Philadelphia? For Medly, the city has proximity to its key markets in New York and New Jersey and a similar level of population density, making it a logical choice for expansion. The median age in Philadelphia is also 34.3, and with a younger population also comes the desire for new technological advances to make everyday life more convenient. “Our research found that from a geographic viewpoint, Philadelphia is very similar to where we operate now in that it has high concentrations of population in certain areas,” he said. “We also saw a strong need for something like what we offer.”

 

To learn more, visit:

https://www.utexas.edu/

https://www.cvs.com.html

https://www.medlypharmacy.com/

 

Gov. Wolf’s Pennsylvania Budget Prioritizes Education, Income

Gov. Wolf’s Pennsylvania Budget Prioritizes Education, Income

By: Sara Warden

2 min read February 2020 — Democrat Gov. Tom Wolf focused his 2020-21 budget on education and income, proposing an increase in spending of almost 6% to $34 billion over the fiscal year, including $600 million to cover cost overruns. Republicans criticized the heavy reliance of the budget on the assumption that revenue would grow by 4.5% ($1.6 billion) over the period. The proposals also require borrowing funds. “It’s easy to put things on a credit card and then ask other people in the future to pay for it,” said Republican State Representative Stan Saylor. “That is not the solution for Pennsylvania.”

 1. There will be no major tax increases

Instead of tax increases for citizens, several novel approaches were proposed in the budget to fund services, one of which was a state police fee based on number of incidents and coverage area. Wolf estimates the initiative will bring in $136 million to fund police services. Another way taxes could stay flat is by imposing a tax on the Marcellus Shale natural gas field to be placed in a $4.5 billion infrastructure fund. Based on 2019 production, Wolf believes the tax would generate more than $600 million per year.

Sweeping changes will be made to charter school funding

Wolf proposed a reduction in the obligatory payments school districts must make when one of their students decides to attend a charter school, which would save districts $280 million annually, according to the governor. “Our charter school system is in desperate need of reform,” Wolf said in a sharp rebuke of the charter school system. “It’s time to close the loopholes. It’s time to establish real standards, and it’s time to level the playing field.”

2. Revisiting previous proposals.

The Wolf administration wants the state to increase basic education spending by $100 million and special education by $25 million. He wants all school districts to offer full-day kindergarten, shifting 22,000 students who attend half-day programs into full days. He wants budgets on the whole for Pre-K to be increased by $30 million, most of which will be allocated to the state-run Pre-K Counts program. Finally, he proposed an increase in the state’s minimum teaching salary from $18,500 to $45,000, impacting 3,000 teachers. 

3. Higher minimum wage is high on the agenda

Wolf’s government has always championed higher minimum wages but has been met with stiff resistance. The governor wants to increase Pennsylvania’s minimum wage to $15 per hour on a gradual basis. The current minimum wage is $7.25, which he proposes should be increased to $12 this July and every consecutive year by $0.50 until reaching $15 in 2026.

Another issue the governor addressed was gun reform, which is unusual for a budget speech. Gov. Wolf made an impassioned plea for the state to take gun laws more seriously. “The steps I’m proposing are supported by the evidence and supported by the vast majority of Pennsylvanians,” Wolf said. “To let another session go by without action would be a failure of imagination that will cost lives.”

 

To learn more, visit:

https://www.governor.pa.gov/

http://www.repsaylor.com/

 

Philadelphia Building on Life Sciences Success

Philadelphia Building on Life Sciences Success

By: Sara Warden

2 min read January 2020 — Last March, Philadelphia came in at an impressive eighth in CBRE’s ranking of top life sciences markets. Now, almost a year on, the city’s life sciences industry shows no sign of losing momentum – in fact, it is gathering speed.

Last week, the Philadelphia Science Center announced it would award $200,000 each to three Philadelphia-based researchers to develop their early-stage concepts for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The individuals – Ian Henrich, a postdoctoral researcher at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; Emily Day, a bioengineer at the University of Delaware; and Haim H. Bau, a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania – are developing novel technologies to progress the understanding, detection and prevention of cancers, HIV and sickle cell disease.

This strong focus as a city on the importance of cutting-edge research is one factor that attracts multi-million-dollar companies from around the United States to invest in Philadelphia, which in turn attracts auxiliary services such as specialized logistics and software companies. Digital marketing firm Imre Health, which represents AstraZeneca’s diabetes and respiratory portfolios, announced its decision to establish an office in Philadelphia late last year for just that reason.

“We have carved out a niche at Imre, redefining the patient and HCP experience through digital channels, and Philadelphia is the [ripest] with that kind of talent even compared to New York,” Imre’s President and Partner Jeff Smokler told PR Week. “We view this Philadelphia office as a major tool to help us manage growth and ensure that we’re keeping pace with service needs and requirements. We see the Philadelphia office as dousing the industry with more gasoline.”

But the real test of the success of any company is its ability to list on a stock exchange. In 2019, three of Philadelphia’s life science companies went public, raising nearly $200 million in IPOs. Arch Street-based biotech company Cabaletta Bio raised $74.8 million. Galera Therapeutics, which is developing a treatment that reduces harmful effects that stem from radiation therapy, raised $60 million, with an option for investors to purchase an additional 750,000 shares. And in November, Tela Bio, a surgical reconstruction company developing novel material for tissue reinforcement, raised $52 million in exchange for the 4 million shares it leveraged.

It doesn’t stop there. In October, Anpac Bio, a Chinese bio-medical science company, chose Philadelphia for its US headquarters and second clinical laboratory. “We are very excited to be moving forward with our U.S. corporate headquarters and laboratory in Pennsylvania. The state has a mature life sciences ecosystem and a supportive startup environment that will allow our U.S. business to lay the foundation for future success,” said Shaun Gong, Anpac’s U.S. president, in a press release.

To learn more, visit:

https://sciencecenter.org/

https://www.cbre.com/

https://imre.com/health/

https://cabalettabio.com/

https://www.galeratx.com/

https://www.telabio.com/

https://www.anpacbio.com/

 

New inventory, worldwide recognition to expand Philly’s hospitality in 2020

New inventory, worldwide recognition to expand Philly’s hospitality in 2020

By: Yolanda Rivas

2 min read January 2020 — Philadelphia’s hospitality industry welcomed a variety of hotels and restaurants in 2019, and the new year will see that growth continue. The city’s expanding and diversifying hotel inventory is a trend that even industry leaders are keeping an eye on.

“We are closely monitoring the impact of additional supply entering the market in 2020, and continue to ensure we are providing our guests with a unique and personal experience that helps to create the loyalty we know will keep our valued guests staying with us year after year, as the options in our city continue to expand,” Michael Roberts, area general manager at The Windsor Suites Philadelphia told Invest:.

Philadelphia’s growing business community has presented a variety of opportunities for the city’s hospitality sector. According to Visit Philadelphia President and CEO Jeff Guaracino, cities around the world are looking at private and public investments made in Philadelphia and how they’ve positively impacted the city’s tourism ecosystem.

“Recently, we’ve seen enhancements to the city’s historical, cultural and dining options, the Pennsylvania Convention Center and to our stadiums in South Philadelphia. These are just a few examples, but they show us how appealing our city’s product is when viewed holistically,” Guaracino said in an interview with Invest:

Another fact that can have a positive impact in the City of Brotherly Love’s hospitality sector is its recognition as one of the top destinations to visit in 2020 by National Geographic. Philadelphia was one of only two U.S. destinations (alongside the Grand Canyon) among the 25 must-see destinations and travel experiences in this year’s list of the Best Trips to take. “We’re thrilled that Philadelphia is featured so prominently and beautifully in this influential publication that we know drives travel decisions,” said Visit Philadelphia’s Guaracino in a written statement. 

In 2018, the Greater Philadelphia region marked its ninth consecutive year of record visitation and the highest number of passengers through Philadelphia International Airport since 2008, according to Guaracino. 

“The city is fairly evenly split in thirds between corporate, leisure and group business. We value each, and are always working to develop each segment. The type of traveler segment that is most prevalent does vary throughout the year. We experience the same variations in the business cycle,” said Roberts. 

Philadelphia’s new hotel inventory for 2020 includes: 

  • Canopy by Hilton Philadelphia Center City opening in May 2020
  • W Hotel opening June 2020
  • Element Hotel Philadelphia opening June 2020
  • The Hyatt Centric Hotel opening June 2020
  • River House at Odette’s opening June 2020
  • Live! Casino & Hotel Philadelphia opening December 2020

 

To learn more about our interviewees, visit:

The Windsor Suites Philadelphia: https://www.thewindsorsuites.com/ 

Visit Philadelphia: https://www.visitphilly.com/ 

 

Spotlight On: Joseph Culley, Head of Capital Markets Group, Janney Montgomery Scott LLC

Spotlight On: Joseph Culley, Head of Capital Markets Group, Janney Montgomery Scott LLC

By: Yolanda Rivas

2 min read January 2020 — An increase in high-net-worth investors, financial professionals moving back to the city and changes to organizational structures are some of the trends financial institutions are experiencing in Philadelphia. Janney Montgomery Scott LLC Head of Capital Markets Group Joseph Culley shared with Invest: some of the adjustments it has implemented amid the change in demographics and advances in technology.

What are some trends in Philadelphia’s financial sector?

 

We are starting to see more finance professionals leave cities like New York when they are at the age to start a family and coming back to Philadelphia. Although young talent retention has been a challenge, Philadelphians who moved to other cities after they graduated college are relocating back to the area. Our education system, arts and culture, transportation system, housing affordability and diverse environment are some of the drivers for residents.

 

What impact is technology having on banking?

 

The pace of change is happening more rapidly due to the disruption of technology in financial services. We have invested significantly in our technology platform and recently hired some of our first data scientists. Our company culture is starting to feel less like an investment firm and more like a technology firm. While we provide our client base with human experience and advice beyond investments, we are focusing on offering them more technological, mobile-friendly and artificial intelligence types of innovations and solutions.

 

What is the investment profile in Philadelphia?

 

We have seen an increase in high-net-worth investors coming to Philadelphia. We have significantly addressed the need we had for higher-end, condo-type properties that we lacked for years, and with that has come more international investment and out of state investment. One of our newer initiatives is focused on investment education and ways to provide more basic, fundamental knowledge about saving for retirement and investing.

 

What are some of the challenges facing financial institutions in today’s landscape?

 

The change in demographics is one of the challenges we are facing. Based on our internal projections, our workforce will be majority millennials within six years. That creates numerous opportunities for a firm like us to modernize and adjust. We recently made changes to our employee benefits, parental leave and dress code policies, based on feedback from our employee population. Organizational development and diversity and inclusion are some of the other areas we have been investing in due to these demographic and generational changes.

 

To learn more about our interviewee, visit:

Janney Montgomery Scott LLC: https://www.janney.com/